Test Case Variable is visually not accepted

I added a new Test Case Variable named testOnly when I go to the Script tab of my Test Case I see it underlined which usually means its something missing or not accepted, only visually.

When I tried to run my Test Case it can actually use the TC Variable without any issue.

1 Please let us know how would your work be affected if this issue has not been resolved?

  1. It doesn’t affect much, but I believe Katalon team should have this ticket resolved
  2. I can continue my job, resolving this ticket can boost my performance
  3. I can continue my job, but my performance is lower than expected
  4. I cannot continue my job and have to work on something else while awaiting your response

Windows 10 Operating System

  • For example: Windows 10 or OSX Sierra

v7.3.1 Katalon Studio Version

  • Windows logs folder: \config.metadata.log

  • macOS logs folder: file:///Applications/Katalon%20Studio.app/Contents/MacOS/config/.metadata/.plugins/org.eclipse.ui.workbench/log

Screenshots / Videos

tc_variable

  • Please attach screenshots or videos if necessary to reproduce the issue

Not a bug.

Variables defined in the variable tab are ‘known’ by the testcase script only at the runtime, via binding mechanism

i think this is how it works under the hood:
https://groovy-lang.org/integrating.html#_sharing_data_between_a_script_and_the_application

2 Likes

Correct. Like @bionel said, that’s just how it works. Annoying? Yes. Fixable? I think not :confused:

(Moving out of bug reports).

1 Like

Moving out of bug reports

Sure! Sorry not sure what basket to put it in.

Annoying? Yes. Fixable? I think not :confused:

Yeah something we can live with. Was hoping for an improvement on this in the future.

Thanks for the quick replies @Russ_Thomas & @bionel

not sure if this can be fixed easily.
hard to train eclipse engine to learn something generated ‘on-the-fly’ without affecting the main-app performance.
I don’t think it has been designed with groovy script features in mind.

That’s precisely the point. The underlining is a “hint” at what might go wrong when the code is compiled in Java. Groovy supports dynamic typing (and late binding etc) which the compiler and eclipse assist technology isn’t aware of.

I think we’re all done here… closing.